making rice pudding, recipes

Rice Pudding Recipes

I’ve never eaten rice pudding, although I’ve seen it for sale in grocery stores. Some of these recipes are quite elaborate and time-consuming. INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS A PLAIN RICE PUDDING
 Swell the rice with a little milk over a fire, then put in acid apples pared and cut in thin slices, or gooseberries and currants. Add a couple of eggs and a teaspoon of salt. Fill your pudding bag half full and boil […]

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vintage ad for yeast, potato yeast, hop yeast

Making Your Own Yeast

Until the mid-1800s, people made their own yeasts to use in baking bread. In 1868, Charles and Max Fleischmann created a compressed yeast cake and began selling it commercially.  This was certainly easier than making your own! INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS The best kinds of yeast are dry yeast, soft hop yeast, and potato yeast. The hard yeast should be made in the month of May or early in June for summer use, and […]

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children eating, old fashioned, vintage, diet for children

Foods For Children

Parents living in the 1800s fed their children for nourishment only. They would have been appalled to see all the sugary and processed foods children eat today. INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS: Children, in general, have very excellent appetites, and a sufficiency of nourishing food is absolutely necessary—not merely to renew the waste of their systems, but also to supply materials for their daily growth. Three, or perhaps four, light meals a day, will be found […]

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mush, gruel, infant food, baby food, soft food

Foods for Infants / Babies

It’s interesting to read what foods were given to babies in the 1800s.  It sure is a lot different from feeding babies today. GLOSSARY Aliment – Food; nourishment Efficacious – Having the desired effect. Farinaceous – Mealy, having starch. Groats – Whole grains that include the cereal germ, bran, and endosperm. Hob – A flat metal shelf in a fireplace, used for heating pans. Rusks – A dry biscuit or twice-baked bread Semolina, or Manna Croup – The […]

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gelatine dessert, jello dessert, 1800s recipes

Gelatine Desserts

In 1894, Charles Knox saw all the work his wife had to go through to make gelatin, and decided to find an easier way. Through experimentation, he created a gelatin superior to any others on the market. His gelatin was made into dried sheets and Knox hired salesmen to show women how to use them. In 1896, Rose Knox published Dainty Desserts, a recipe book using Knox gelatin. Then in 1897, Pearle Bixby Wait trademarked […]

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sandwiches

Unusual Sandwiches from the 1800s

I don’t make sandwiches too often, but they’re boring compared to these from 1800s cookbooks.  I was especially intrigued by the bean sandwich recipe and the one for an anchovy sandwich. Bread was homemade and had to be sliced, as the first automatically sliced loaves of bread weren’t produced until 1928. INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS: Bread for sandwiches should be at least one day old. Cut into thin slices of uniform size (dip the […]

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forcemeat

What is Forcemeat?

Forcemeat is made by mixing finely chopped lean meat with fat, and adding other flavorings. Forcemeat can be used as a stuffing, made into balls or patties, or formed into flat square or oval pieces like in the photograph. GLOSSARY Drams – A unit of weight formerly used by apothecaries, equal to one-eighth of an ounce. Gammon – Ham that has been cured or smoked like bacon. Gill – A liquid measurement. Four ounces in the U.S. and […]

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escargot snails

How to Cook Snails

I’ve read through dozens of old cookbooks from the 1800s and this is the only time I’ve seen snails mentioned. This photo is of escargot (land snails) but they look bigger than any snails I’ve ever seen. The information below is from The Hand-Book of Practical Cookery For Ladies and Professional Cooks by Pierre Blot , New York, 1884 SNAILS A good many are now imported from Europe. HOW TO CLEAN AND PREPARE SNAILS Throw them […]

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