turtle soup label

Turtle Was a Popular Dish in the 1800s

Many cookbooks from the 1800s included recipes for cooking turtle; snapping turtle, box turtle, sea turtle, and diamondback terrapin. Today, many species of turtles are endangered and it’s illegal to capture or kill them.  In the U.S., you can hunt diamondback terrapins and snapping turtles, but only in season and you must have a hunting license. The photo is of a label from a can of A. Granday’s Turtle Soup. In 1971, The Endangered Species Act was passed […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
sandwiches

Unusual Sandwiches from the 1800s

I don’t make sandwiches too often, but they’re boring compared to these from 1800s cookbooks.  I was especially intrigued by the bean sandwich recipe and the one for an anchovy sandwich. Bread was homemade and had to be sliced, as the first automatically sliced loaves of bread weren’t produced until 1928. INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS: Bread for sandwiches should be at least one day old. Cut into thin slices of uniform size (dip the […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
breakfast foods

Family Breakfasts For Winter

When I was growing up, we mostly ate buttered toast, Raisin Bran and Cheerios cold cereal before we went to school.  On weekends, my mother often cooked eggs, French toast, or pancakes. Now, as an adult, I like bacon or sausage with eggs, often with cheese and mushrooms. But I’ll eat anything, even leftovers from lunch or dinner. In the 1800s, people often ate eggs for breakfast if they had them, and most of the […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
forcemeat

What is Forcemeat?

Forcemeat is made by mixing finely chopped lean meat with fat, and adding other flavorings. Forcemeat can be used as a stuffing, made into balls or patties, or formed into flat square or oval pieces like in the photograph. GLOSSARY Drams – A unit of weight formerly used by apothecaries, equal to one-eighth of an ounce. Gammon – Ham that has been cured or smoked like bacon. Gill – A liquid measurement. Four ounces in the U.S. and […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
canning tomatoes

Pickle Tomatoes, Make Chutney and Catchup

This is a continuation of the post Ways to Use and Cook Tomatoes.  GLOSSARY: Fortnight – a period of two weeks. Peck – A measurement for dry volume. A peck is two gallons or eight dry quarts. Four pecks make a bushel. Scald – To heat liquid almost to a boil, until bubbles begin to form around the edge. Strew – Scatter or spread untidily over a surface or area. INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS: PICKLING TOMATOES Scald […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
boiling chicken

The Proper Way to Boil Meat

An easy way to cook meat was to boil it,  but it wasn’t the most flavorful. I have boiled chicken to make soup, but never beef or pork (except for hot dogs). INFORMATION BELOW FROM 1800s COOKBOOKS: The method of preparing meat by boiling is not strongly advocated, for there is seldom a time when better results cannot be obtained by cooking meat at a lower temperature than at the boiling point. When water becomes […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
tomatoes in garden

Ways to Use and Cook Tomatoes

Back in the 1800s, tomatoes were a seasonal food since there were no hot-houses to grow them in.  Since there was no refrigeration, people could only have tomatoes out of season by canning, drying, or making them into preserves. I rarely buy canned soups, but I’ll try making my own tomato soup when fresh tomatoes are available at farmer’s markets. The recipe for tomato croquettes sounds interesting, too. GLOSSARY: Gill – A liquid measurement. Four […]

Shares 0
Continue reading
fresh spinach

Ways to Cook Fresh Spinach

I usually eat raw spinach in a salad and occasionally will order a spinach quiche in a restaurant.  But these spinach recipes from old 1800s cookbooks makes me want to experiment and add some variety to my diet. GLOSSARY Gill – A liquid measurement. Four ounces in the U.S. and five ounces in the U.K. Peck –  A measurement for dry volume. A peck is two gallons or eight dry quarts. Four pecks make a bushel. Moderate […]

Shares 0
Continue reading